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Current HAPS-I course offerings


Courses are continually added, watch our Facebook and Google+ pages for the latest course announcements!  To see previous courses use the drop down menu above.

Be sure to check out the Life Sciences Teaching Resource Community HAPS-I course collections


Fall 2015


Rational Human Anatomy & Physiology Course Design: Incorporating the HAPS outcomes into new and existing courses.
(2 credits) September 13 - November 2, 2015
Margaret A. Weck, D.A.
St. Louis College of Pharmacy
View syllabus
Register now:  Graduate Credit or Professional Development

The course is briefly reviews the major concepts associated with the "backwards design" model of rational course development, which stresses the value of thinking through the ultimate outcome goals (both in content mastery and cognitive skill development) for a course as a first step the course design process. Participants will examine the HAPS Course Guidelines for Undergraduate Instruction and A&P Learning Outcome statements and think about the design elements, teaching methodologies, and assessments (both formative and summative) that would best foster student achievement of these outcomes. The course will be conducted entirely on-line. Participants will produce syllabi for new or existing courses that demonstrate the principles of rational course design. As part of this process sample assignments and assessments will also be developed that could be used in any course to demonstrate student achievement of the A&P Learning Outcomes.

 


 Spring 2016

 

Teaching Central Nervous System Concepts Using Diagnostic Radiology and Case Studies
(2 credits) Dates coming soon
Carmen Eilertson
Alverno College, Milwaukee, WI
Registration opening soon

Students enrolled in college level Anatomy and Physiology courses are required to learn brain and spinal cord anatomy and function. This course will help you develop cases incorporating radiology of the CNS into your teaching portfolio. Students find this method of teaching to be meaningful because they learn how to read radiograms and correlate their analysis with patient symptoms. It is a perfect way to integrate anatomy with physiology and teach valuable diagnostic skills at the same time. Most of your students will enter the health care field and will benefit from learning clinical problem solving skills early in their academic development. The cases developed as part this course can be used as in class activities, enhancements to your current lecture power points, or as clicker quizzes or exam questions.