HAPS Institute Previous Course Offerings

Courses listed here have already completed and are not currently offered by the HAPS Institute


Summer 2016


Writing Case Studies for Teaching A&P: Pathophysiology and Physiology
(2 credits or professional development) May 15 - July 24, 2016
Dr. Brian R. Shmaefsky
Lone Star College - Kingwood
View Syllabus

This course will provide scientific and pedagogical background for faculty to design effective teaching case studies for allied health, anatomy and physiology, histology, molecular biology, and pathology courses. Students enrolled in the human sciences typically enter career fields that require the analytical interpretation of dynamic situations in clinical and research settings. Case studies are stories used as a teaching tool to show the application of a theory or concept to real situations. A particular case study is dependent on the goal it is meant to fulfill. Cases can be fact-driven and deductive where there is a correct answer or they can be context driven where multiple solutions are possible outcomes. A major advantage of teaching with case studies is that the students are actively engaged in figuring out the principles of A&P by extracting relevant content needed to resolve the case. In the most straightforward application, the presentation of the case study establishes a framework for student analysis. A case study provides enough information for the students to figure out solutions and then identify how to apply those solutions in other similar situations. Instructors may choose to use several cases so the students can identify both the similarities and differences among cases.


Teaching Central Nervous System Concepts Using Diagnostic Radiology and Case Studies
(2 credits or professional development) May 21 - July 8, 2016
Carmen Eilertson
Georgia State University
View Syllabus

Students enrolled in college level Anatomy and Physiology courses are required to learn brain and spinal cord anatomy and function. This course will help you develop cases incorporating radiology of the CNS into your teaching portfolio. Students find this method of teaching to be meaningful because they learn how to read radiograms and correlate their analysis with patient symptoms. It is a perfect way to integrate anatomy with physiology and teach valuable diagnostic skills at the same time. Most of your students will enter the health care field and will benefit from learning clinical problem solving skills early in their academic development. The cases developed as part this course can be used as in class activities, enhancements to your current lecture power points, or as clicker quizzes or exam questions.


Fall 2015

Rational Human Anatomy & Physiology Course Design: Incorporating the HAPS outcomes into new and existing courses.
Margaret A. Weck, D.A. 
(2 credits) September 13 - November 2, 2015

View Syllabus

The course is briefly reviews the major concepts associated with the "backwards design" model of rational course development, which stresses the value of thinking through the ultimate outcome goals (both in content mastery and cognitive skill development) for a course as a first step the course design process. Participants will examine the HAPS Course Guidelines for Undergraduate Instruction and A&P Learning Outcome statements and think about the design elements, teaching methodologies, and assessments (both formative and summative) that would best foster student achievement of these outcomes. The course will be conducted entirely on-line. Participants will produce syllabi for new or existing courses that demonstrate the principles of rational course design. As part of this process sample assignments and assessments will also be developed that could be used in any course to demonstrate student achievement of the A&P Learning Outcomes.


Summer 2015

Anatomia Italiana: The Cultural History of Anatomy Along the Italian Peninsula
Dr. Kevin Petti
(3 credit) June 1 - August 31, 2015
View Syllabus

This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand their understanding of the rich cultural heritage of anatomy education along the Italian Peninsula, and its connection with Renaissance art. This course is an international experience preceded by a series of readings in peer-reviewed journals and scholarly books intended to put the travel experience into context, and followed by the development of a teaching module. Readings will be discussed in online forums, experienced deeper through the international experience, and applied by way of incorporating the teaching module into an existing anatomy course. The travel component is not included in the tuition of this course.

After a four-week online component, students will participate in a separate 12-day visit to Italy. They will visit anatomy museums in Rome, Florence, Bologna and Padua that are important to the history of anatomy education. These museums include historic anatomy theaters and centuries old anatomical wax models. Traditional cultural sites that contain Renaissance masterpieces, such as the Vatican museums, will also be toured. These masterpieces will be considered within the context of how they were influenced by the dissections conducted by the masters. This interdisciplinary experience allows for students to connect art and anatomy in a unique manner. The result is a deeper and richer understanding of the historic and cultural underpinnings of anatomy education. The travel expenses are not included in the 3-credit tuition for this course - see the website below for more information.

Students who have participated in the travel experience prior to participation in the HAPS-I course are eligible to enroll in this course by completing the remaining online component and submission of an interdisciplinary teaching module. Additional information can be found at AnatomiaItaliana.com


Spring 2015

Introduction to Educational Research Methods
Valerie Dean O'Loughlin, Ph.D.
(1 credit) May 3 - June 15, 2015
View Syllabus

This course is for college level instructors who want to become more familiar with basic educational research methods. Participants will learn about metacognition, how people learn, how people learn, the basics of quantitative versus qualitative educational research methods, how to search the educational literature database, the scholarship of teaching, and develop a foundation for implementing classroom research and assessment. Participants will learn the material through directed readings, online weekly synchronous discussion forums, and face-to-face instruction at the HAPS 2015 meetings (or additional online reading/assignment component, should the participant not be bale to attend the HAPS 2015 conference). In addition, participants will apply the information they have learned in the independent development of an educational research question they want to examine in their own classroom.


Mechanisms of Disease: Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Dr. Brian R. Shmaefsky
(2 credits) February 22,2015 - May 10, 2015
View Syllabus

The last two decades has seen ground-breaking advances in basic and medical research, from the sequencing of the human genome to the identification of over 15 million human DNA variations, to the use of those variations to track down elusive disease genes and epigenetic factors. The wealth of genomic, proteomic, and epigenetics information combined with cutting-edge technologies has changed our past understanding of human disease. This course will examine the cellular, molecular, epigenetic basis of endocrine diseases as a model disease that connects the cellular processes with the physiology and pathophysiology at the tissue and whole organ level. The spectrum of disorders that produces type 2 diabetes will be the focus of younger population. This course uses case studies and current literature reviews in an asynchronous virtual format and will require an online coursework. The ability to interact in formal discussions will be available at the annual HAPS conference. The content of the course is directly applicable to those teaching classes ranging from physiology. This course is designed to facilitate your teaching as well as updating your content knowledge. This course will follow a completely on-line format and will require 20 hours of coursework.


Fall 2014

Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology
Dr. George Ordway
(2 credits) Sept. 22, 2014 - Jan. 31, 2015

View syllabus


This unique course is designed to provide college-level instructors with an opportunity to develop their understanding of the anatomy and physiology of the cardiovascular system, including key cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for function of the heart and blood vessels.  The course also will include examples of pathophysiology that result in common acute and chronic cardiovascular diseases.  Participation in the course will be online only with weekly directed readings and assignments that will be posted to a discussion board for instructor and peer review, along with regularly scheduled interactive conference sessions.  Cardiovascular Physiology (7th ed.) by Mohrman and Heller will be used as the course text along with available internet resources and databases. In addition, selected articles from the primary literature will be used to help participants foster an appreciation of the research that has advanced our knowledge of cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.  Participants also will complete a final project supporting the teaching of cardiovascular biology in a college-level anatomy and physiology course.  The project may take a variety of forms; however, developing a case study or review article will be emphasized.  A total of approximately 60 hours will be required to complete all course work.  Grading will be on a pass/fail basis and evaluation will include successful completion of weekly assignments, pre- and post-course knowledge assessments, a final project, and participation in scheduled conference sessions.  A pass grade will require 75% of a total of 100 points.  This course will serve as the basis for future on-line-only offerings of advanced topics dealing with cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology. 


Rational Human Anatomy & Physiology Course Design: Incorporating the HAPS outcomes into new and existing courses.

(2 credits) Sept 15 - Nov 7, 2014
Dr. Margaret Weck
St. Louis College of Pharmacy
View syllabus

This 8-week course briefly reviews the major concepts associated with the “backwards design” model of rational course development, which stresses the value of thinking through the ultimate outcome goals (both in content mastery and cognitive skill development) for a course as a first step the course design process.  Participants will examine the HAPS Course Guidelines for Undergraduate Instruction and A & P Learning Outcome statements and think about the design elements, teaching methodologies, and assessments (both formative and summative) that would best foster student achievement of these outcomes.  The course will be conducted entirely on-line.  Participants will produce syllabi for new or existing courses that demonstrate the principles of rational course design.  As part of this process sample assignments and assessments will also be developed that could be used in any course to demonstrate student achievement of the A&P Learning Outcomes.


The Physiology of Reproduction
(2 credits) August 24 - December 15, 2014
Dr. Chad M. Wayne, University of Houston
View syllabus

This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand and refine their understanding of key molecular and cellular concepts and processes as they relate to human sexual reproduction. Participants will be introduced to material through directed readings from the current literature that examine the mechanisms that govern the union of the human gametes, the organs that promote pregnancy, and the mechanisms of parturition from the molecular level through the organ level. The participants will explore the material through the directed readings, but will also be encouraged to participate in online discussions to test and expand their understanding of the material. Ultimately, participants will need to demonstrate mastery of the material which will be assessed through specific application in online exercises and in a terminal, peer-reviewed project. Participants will be expected to independently develop at the end of the course, a college-level lecture appropriate for the course that the participant normally instructs. This project should demonstrate a deeper understanding of the key themes in human sexual reproduction, integrate molecular and cellular mechanisms into the participant’s normal lecture routine, and expand the college course beyond the typical A&P or physiology lecture. The participants’ projects will be discussed at the end of the course, either in person at the HAPS annual conference in Jacksonville, FL or via electronic methods. The participant will be evaluated on a variety of criteria, including performance on online exercises, participation and the quality of final project.

Female Reproductive Physiology
(2 credits) August 24 - December 15, 2014
Dr. Chad M. Wayne, University of Houston
View syllabus

Description of course: This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand and refine their understanding of key molecular and cellular concepts and processes as they relate to female reproductive physiology. Participants will be introduced to material through directed readings from the current literature that examine the female reproductive system from the molecular level through the organ level and provide the participant a deeper understanding of how these structures are integrated into a whole system responsible for oocyte production and delivery. The participants will explore the material through the directed readings, but will also be encouraged to participate in online discussions to test and expand their understanding of the material. Ultimately, participants will need to demonstrate mastery of the material which will be assessed through specific application in online exercises and in a terminal, peer-reviewed project. Participants will be expected to independently develop at the end of the course, a college-level lecture appropriate for the course that the participant normally instructs. This project should demonstrate a deeper understanding of the key themes in female reproduction, integrate molecular and cellular mechanisms into the participant’s normal lecture routine, and expand the college course beyond the typical A&P or physiology lecture. The participants’ projects will be discussed at the end of the course, either in person at the HAPS annual conference in Jacksonville, FL or via electronic methods. The participant will be evaluated on a variety of criteria, including performance on online exercises, participation and the quality of final project.


Male Reproductive Physiology
(2 credits) August 24 - December 15, 2014
Dr. Chad M. Wayne, University of Houston
View syllabus

Description of course: This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand and refine their understanding of key molecular and cellular concepts and processes as they relate to male reproductive physiology. Participants will be introduced to material through directed readings from the current literature that examine the male reproductive system from the molecular level through the organ level and provide the participant a deeper understanding of how these structures are integrated into a whole system responsible for sperm production and delivery. The participants will explore the material through the directed readings, but will also be encouraged to participate in online discussions to test and expand their understanding of the material. Ultimately, participants will need to demonstrate mastery of the material which will be assessed through specific application in online exercises and in a terminal, peer-reviewed project. Participants will be expected to independently develop at the end of the course, a college-level lecture appropriate for the course that the participant normally instructs. This project should demonstrate a deeper understanding of the key themes in male reproduction, integrate molecular and cellular mechanisms into the participant’s normal lecture routine, and expand the college course beyond the typical A&P or physiology lecture. The participants’ projects will be discussed at the end of the course, either in person at the HAPS annual conference in Jacksonville, FL or via electronic methods.  The participant will be evaluated on a variety of criteria, including performance on online exercises, participation and the quality of final project.


Summer 2014


Current Issues in Obesity Prevention and Treatment
Krista Lee Rompolski, Ph.D.Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA
(2 credits) July 8 - Aug 31, 2014


Obesity is thought to be caused by the interaction of a genetically susceptible individual with the obesogenic environment. Significant advances in the treatment of obesity, whether behavioral, surgical or pharmacological, have been proven successful at the individual level. However, little success has been achieved in preventing weight gain or maintaining weight loss at a population level. Given obesity’s recent classification as a disease state, it is imperative that instructors of human anatomy and physiology-based courses are familiar with the growing body of knowledge on obesity prevention and treatment. Therefore, the purpose of this course is to understand obesity with a multifactorial approach, addressing the genetic, biological, environmental, societal and behavioral aspects that interact on an individual and population level. Special emphasis will be placed on the integration of knowledge gained from discussion and critique of published clinical and epidemiological studies into an instructor’s curriculum. 



2014 Conference Courses



Current Topics in Anatomy and Physiology
(1 credit) April 18 - June 28, with conference attendance May 2014.
Jason LaPres M.H.S.
Lone Star College - University Park, Houston, TX 
View syllabus 

This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand their understanding of a variety of current topics in the fields of anatomy and physiology, and how these relate to other scientific disciplines. The specific topics covered will depend upon the Update Seminars and workshops offered at a Human Anatomy and Physiology Society’s (HAPS) Jacksonville Annual Conference held on May 24-29, 2014. The course is offered in a hybrid format with both on-line and face-to-face meetings and requires participants to attend the HAPS Jacksonville Annual Conference in May of 2014.

Participants will complete on-line preparatory work before attending the conference. The first part of the course will include critically analyzing scholarly articles related to the Update Seminars, and then discussing the hypotheses, methods, conclusions, strengths and weakness of those articles during on-line discussions. During the face-to-face portion of the course (held at the HAPS Jacksonville Annual Conference), participants will attend all Update Seminars and then meet afterward to discuss and evaluate the speakers’ presentations in relation to the literature reviewed prior to the conference. Participants will be assigned a specific Update Seminar and prepare a brief review of that seminar to share in a meeting with other course participants. This review will be the basis for a more comprehensive review article to be written after the conference. The final review article will include additional citations specific to one assigned Update Seminar topic, and will summarize the speaker’s presentation and the relationship of that presentation to other scholarly research and A&P education. Additionally, the participants will attend workshops in which they review, critique, and expand upon the ideas presented in at least one of those workshops. A final analysis of one of the workshops will be completed after the workshops. 

Teaching Respiratory Physiology I - Functional Anatomy and Ventilation 
(2 credits)   April 18 - June 28,  with Conference attendance May 2014
Jason LaPres M.H.S.
Lone Star College - University Park, Houston, TX 
View syllabus 

This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand their understanding of the anatomy of the respiratory system and pulmonary ventilation. Additionally, students will collaborate on projects that help them to better teach these topics. Students will begin their coursework prior to their scheduled laboratory meeting. Students will have a variety of reading topics, including publically available peer-reviewed articles that they use as a basis of their research project. Students will apply what they learn in the online and face-to-face instruction to write a lesson plan appropriate for A&P faculty teaching undergraduate courses who wish to integrate functional anatomy and/or the mechanisms of breathing into their A&P courses. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a variety of criteria, including attendance, participation in preparatory and workshop activities, and quality of final submitted materials. This course requires participants to attend the HAPS Jacksonville Annual Conference in May of 2014
 

Physiology of Death & Senescence
(2 credits) April 18 - June 28, with Conference attendance May 2014
Dr. Brian R. Schmaesfsky
Lone Star College - Kingwood, Kingwood, TX
View syllabus 

Much of what is taught about the human body is explained from the perspective of normal and sometimes pathological body systems.  Little emphasis is given to the inevitable conditions of senescence and death.  Human senescence and death are elusive constructs that the scientific community tries to explain with concrete descriptions at both the somatic and molecular levels. This course will examine the most approximate descriptions of the gross, cellular, and molecular basis of human death and senescence. Physiological processes associated with somatic death will be discussed in context of the normal and pathological senescent changes occurring at the cellular and molecular levels. The content of the course is directly applicable to those teaching classes including lower level and upper introductory human anatomy, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and physiology. The course instructor has research experience in the molecular basis of senescence and worked in research and forensic necropsy laboratories.  This course requires participants to attend the HAPS Jacksonville Annual Conference in May of 2014.


Rational Human Anatomy & Physiology Course Design: Incorporating the HAPS outcomes into new and existing courses.
(2 credits) May 11 - July 15, 2014
Dr. Margaret Weck
St. Louis College of Pharmacy

View syllabus  

This course briefly reviews the major concepts associated with the "backwards design” model of course development, which stresses the value of thinking through the ultimate outcome goals for a course in the process of course design.  Participants will examine the HAPS Course Guidelines for Undergraduate Instruction and A & P Learning Outcome statements and think about the design elements, teaching methodologies, and assessments (both formative and summative) that would best foster student achievement of these outcomes.  The course includes both distance learning before the conference and a face-to face component at the annual meeting in Jacksonville, FL (during the workshop days Tues. May 27th and Wed. May 28th, 2014).  Participants will produce syllabi for new or existing courses that demonstrate the principles of rational course design and sample assignments and assessments that could be used in any course to demonstrate student achievement of the A&P Learning Outcomes.


Spring 2014

The Physiology of Reproduction
(2 credits) January 12 - May 29, 2014
Dr. Chad M. Wayne, Department of Biology & Biochemistry
University of Houston

View syllabus

Description of course: This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand and refine their understanding of key molecular and cellular concepts and processes as they relate to human sexual reproduction. Participants will be introduced to material through directed readings from the current literature that examine the mechanisms that govern the union of the human gametes, the organs that promote pregnancy, and the mechanisms of parturition from the molecular level through the organ level. The participants will explore the material through the directed readings, but will also be encouraged to participate in online discussions to test and expand their understanding of the material. Ultimately, participants will need to demonstrate mastery of the material which will be assessed through specific application in online exercises and in a terminal, peer-reviewed project. Participants will be expected to independently develop at the end of the course, a college-level lecture appropriate for the course that the participant normally instructs. This project should demonstrate a deeper understanding of the key themes in human sexual reproduction, integrate molecular and cellular mechanisms into the participant’s normal lecture routine, and expand the college course beyond the typical A&P or physiology lecture. The participants’ projects will be discussed at the end of the course, either in person at the HAPS annual conference in Jacksonville, FL or via electronic methods. The participant will be evaluated on a variety of criteria, including performance on online exercises, participation and the quality of final project.



Male Reproductive Physiology (2 credits) January 12 - May 29, 2014
Dr. Chad M. Wayne, Department of Biology & Biochemistry
University of Houston

View syllabus

Description of course: This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand and refine their understanding of key molecular and cellular concepts and processes as they relate to male reproductive physiology. Participants will be introduced to material through directed readings from the current literature that examine the male reproductive system from the molecular level through the organ level and provide the participant a deeper understanding of how these structures are integrated into a whole system responsible for sperm production and delivery. The participants will explore the material through the directed readings, but will also be encouraged to participate in online discussions to test and expand their understanding of the material. Ultimately, participants will need to demonstrate mastery of the material which will be assessed through specific application in online exercises and in a terminal, peer-reviewed project. Participants will be expected to independently develop at the end of the course, a college-level lecture appropriate for the course that the participant normally instructs. This project should demonstrate a deeper understanding of the key themes in male reproduction, integrate molecular and cellular mechanisms into the participant’s normal lecture routine, and expand the college course beyond the typical A&P or physiology lecture. The participants’ projects will be discussed at the end of the course, either in person at the HAPS annual conference in Jacksonville, FL or via electronic methods.  The participant will be evaluated on a variety of criteria, including performance on online exercises, participation and the quality of final project.

 

Female Reproductive Physiology
(2 credits) January 12 - May 29, 2014
Dr. Chad M. Wayne, Department of Biology & Biochemistry
University of Houston
View syllabus

Description of course: This course is designed to provide college-level instructors with the opportunity to expand and refine their understanding of key molecular and cellular concepts and processes as they relate to female reproductive physiology. Participants will be introduced to material through directed readings from the current literature that examine the female reproductive system from the molecular level through the organ level and provide the participant a deeper understanding of how these structures are integrated into a whole system responsible for oocyte production and delivery. The participants will explore the material through the directed readings, but will also be encouraged to participate in online discussions to test and expand their understanding of the material. Ultimately, participants will need to demonstrate mastery of the material which will be assessed through specific application in online exercises and in a terminal, peer-reviewed project. Participants will be expected to independently develop at the end of the course, a college-level lecture appropriate for the course that the participant normally instructs. This project should demonstrate a deeper understanding of the key themes in female reproduction, integrate molecular and cellular mechanisms into the participant’s normal lecture routine, and expand the college course beyond the typical A&P or physiology lecture. The participants’ projects will be discussed at the end of the course, either in person at the HAPS annual conference in Jacksonville, FL or via electronic methods. The participant will be evaluated on a variety of criteria, including performance on online exercises, participation and the quality of final project.